Sedition Wars Terrain Set Crates

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Crates

Recently I completed and showed off the barricades from the Sedition Wars Kickstarter’s Terrain Set. Today I have some more scatter terrain to share – specifically the crates.

Not my work. Clicky the pic to go to Agis' site for lots more Imperial Assault goodness.

Not my work, but the work that inspired these getting painted after all this time. Clicky the pic to go to Agis’ site for lots more Imperial Assault goodness.

Once again, I’ll show the pic and link to the post that inspired me to dig them out and get them done – from Agis Neugebauer’s blog. I liked the weathering that he put into the crates, and also liked the contrast created via the red straps. He did use transfers to define them with Imperial cogs, and once again I decided to skip any markings that would tie them to any one universe, so they can be used in anything from “movie-style” Bolt Action WWII (when we don’t go to great pains to ensure historical accuracy of the design of all the crates left around that are being used as cover, through moderns, Star Wars (we can see how well they work above), near-future, post-apocalyptic right through to the 41st Millennium, where mundane things still often look strangely familiar…

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Crates, Metal Cadian Imperial Guard, Minotaurs Space Marines

The proud warriors of the Minotaurs Chapter provide scale reference alongside members of the Terror Australis Regiment of the A̶s̶t̶r̶a̶ ̶M̶i̶l̶i̶t̶a̶r̶u̶m̶ Imperial Guard

As can be seen, I gave them a light weathering, though not to the level of detail or care that Agis did on his. As far as scatter terrain goes, they’re really just more of the same sort of stuff I usually churn out at the level I’m happy to go with, generally. Not superbly exciting by any means, but additional, solid looking stuff that looks better than simply a spray and wash, a bit of extra weathering, though not nearly to the effort put in by people like D&B in his diorama-level pieces. Oh, I also found and finished one more of those U.S. DUST Tactics Supply Drop Crates, so it gets a guest appearance in this photo.

And finally, some “in action” type shots alongside some of the other appropriate scatter terrain I’ve finished in roughly the last year. DUST Tactics Supply Drop Boxes, DUST Tactics Dragon’s Teeth and Confrontation Walls, and the very recent Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades. There’s not a lot of height variation, nor any foliage, but just these bits of scatter make a passable battle site for a small combat patrol sized skirmish.

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Crates, Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades, Confrontation Walls, DUST Dragon’s Teeth, DUST Supply Drop Boxes, Metal Cadian Imperial Guard, Minotaurs Space Marines, Urbanmatz Badlands Mat

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Crates, Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades, Confrontation Walls, DUST Dragon’s Teeth, DUST Supply Drop Boxes, Metal Cadian Imperial Guard, Minotaurs Space Marines, Urbanmatz Badlands Mat

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Crates, Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades, Confrontation Walls, DUST Dragon’s Teeth, DUST Supply Drop Boxes, Metal Cadian Imperial Guard, Minotaurs Space Marines, Urbanmatz Badlands Mat

Stop here. Sit and rest awhile – Mantic’s Mars Attacks Stop Signs and Benches.

A bit over a year ago I busted open my Mars Attacks Accessory sets, and got to (slowly) working on the contents (occasionally). So far, I’ve finished the incredibly unimpressive result of 8 box stacks, from the four sets I had. Recently, I’ve finished a few other bits and pieces. Namely, the STOP signs, and the benches.

Mantic Mars Attacks Accessory Scenery Stop Sign 28mm Wargaming

You can’t really tell here, but there’s a subtle metallic as part of the red and I tried out Warcolours Metallic White on the white sections. I did this to emulate the reflective qualities of real STOP signs, at least those located in Melbourne, where I live. I initially tried the metallic white over silver but it worked poorly, so I repainted the details in white, and then went over with the Metallic White. Even in-hand, the metallic effect needs to be pointed out with an “oh yeah, now I see it” result. A kinda generic grungy grey for the bases.

Mantic Mars Attacks Accessory Scenery Benches 28mm Wargaming

The benches. To me they seemed much more like public bus (or tram) stop-style benches than anything else. In keeping with this, I painted them in a horribly-plasticy bright orange, of the sort that would have been seen back in the 1980’s. Of course, back in the 80’s here the bus stop benches were made of concrete and wood, and painted a dark green. I dunno, I could have gone with a sleeker, more modern silver which would have been easier, but I felt that a harsh, bright colour (then dirtied a little) is a little more evocative of actual urban city streets. And the horrid orange just “feels” right for a bus stop. I used Warcolour’s Orange “One Coat”, though naturally, it took multiple coats to actually cover over the base silver spray. So much for “One” Coat…

Mars Attacks Scenery Pic from Children of the Kraken Blog - go visit!

Mars Attacks Accessory Pic from Iron Saint’s Children of the Kraken Blog – go visit!

I’m recycling this pic from the post about boxes again, to show the contents of the full sets, along with just how little I’ve actually gotten done so far. I have the rubbish bins and mailboxes sitting in a little container, sprayed silver. I wanted to salt-weather them, but haven’t gotten around to it yet, and at this rate it’ll be a long wait until next summer before I get off my arse and get them done. I want to do a similar thing with the picket fences. In my mind’s eye, they’re dirty white, with the paint peeling off (salt weathering) to reveal stained grey wood underneath.

Mantic Mars Attacks Accessory Scenery Stop Sign Benches 28mm Wargaming

Scale shot with thanks to a Minotaurs Space Marine and a T-800 Endoskeleton. I think these will be perfect for any modern/post apoc and even urban sci-fi battlefield that’s not too far removed from “Earth-like” environments. One day I might even paint up my Secret Weapon tiles from their Kickstarter. Seems like a Summer project…

 

Oh, and as an addendum. I found these yesterday. Ignore the game of Runebound in progress and note the ten(!) additional accessory packs that were inside a tub of Mars Attacks scenery when I was looking for an unassembled incomplete Imperial Bastion. That’s a hell of a lot of mould-line scraping before I can get to the easy-ish part of painting up all that scatter terrain…

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades, Metal Cadian Imperial Guard

Remember Sedition Wars and it’s incredibly-successful Kickstarter? Of course you don’t. That’s because you either never heard of it, or the complete abortion of a game and fulfilment means you’ve blocked it from your memory like a terrible life experience, which it very much was. I was one of the ones taken in by a love and respect of Mike McVey going back decades to my youth and being foolish enough to believe the h̶y̶p̶e̶ lies of the campaign put on by Studio McVey and CMON to the tune of quite a few hundred dollars for my multiple pledges. Anyway, this post isn’t to bitch about the pile of money I flushed down the toilet in a mess of warped boards, terrible unplaytested rules and restic models.

It’s about the one bright spot of the entire project (aside from the textured bases, I guess). The Terrain Set. More specifically, for this post, the barricades. I’ve been buying a bit of stuff for FFG’s various Star Wars games in the past 6 months or so, and part of that has naturally involved looking at pictures of stuff.

Not my work. Clicky the pic to go to Agis' site for lots more Imperial Assault goodness.

Not my work, but the work that inspired these getting painted after all this time. Clicky the pic to go to Agis’ site for lots more Imperial Assault goodness.

While doing so, I came across some pics on Agis Neugebauer’s blog. Now, he’s a poster over on Dakka, and I’m somewhat familiar with his work posted there, but I hadn’t seen his Star Wars Imperial Assault stuff before. Lots of great stuff there, including an Oskara conversion that I will totally be ripping off, but Agis’ also has a bunch of the Sedition Wars stuff painted up, and looking pretty bloody sweet. This triggered the “Hey, I’ve got those somewhere!” reaction, and off I went to find the crates, and while doing so, also grabbed out the barricades.

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades

The barricades got finished first. Sprayed a custom green based on Vallejo’s 890 Reflective Green, then oversprayed with Plastic Soldier Company’s German Field Grey (Don’t buy their spray cans – they leak!). I then added the Lambdas, taken from a Warlord Games decal sheet (I would have preferred some white outline tank numbers from the WLG German Turret sheet, but I didn’t have any, and Lambdas are totally a thing in modern military markings and so in my mind help these pieces fit anything from near-future to 40k. I then drybrushed the barricades with Army Painter’s Army Green, and then Vallejo Bonewhite on the extremes. Some foam-weathering with Vallejo Metal Black, Vallejo Plate Mail Metal coloured primer and Vallejo Scorched Brown. Followed up with a spray of Plastic Soldier Company’s Dirt Brown Weathering Spray (they leak, FFS!), wiped down with a damp cloth, and finally a quick go-over with some of the foam-weathering, and they were ready for a heavy spray of gloss polyurethane varnish for protection, and then the good old Testor’s Dullcote to make them look good.

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades

I also wanted to avoid any overtly-distinguishing iconography that would tie them too closely to any particular universe. So this meant no Imperial Aquilas or Imperial Cogs, and the dirty weathered look fits pretty well with just about anything, except maybe an especially-shiny game of Infinity. I can’t see pre-fab barriers getting carefully cleaned before being loaded into a transport between deployments, after all.

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades, Metal Cadian Imperial Guard

I have 12 barricades in total and I think they came up very nicely, but I’m also quite aware that looking at the individual weathering patterns on each of them isn’t exactly enthralling blog content, so here are some more posed shots with a few of my Imperial Guardsmen from the Terror Australis Regiment providing scale. Also, a sneak preview of my next mat review…

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades, Metal Cadian Imperial Guard

Sedition Wars Terrain Set Barricades, Metal Cadian Imperial Guard

 

Review: Urbanmatz’ 6’x4′ Snow Territory Game Mat.

Warning, Pic HEAVY! – Also, most pics can be clicked for larger versions.

Recently, at the end of 2016 I placed an order for three gaming mats from Urbanmatz, based in the Czech Republic. There was a delay on one of the mats I ordered, as it was out of stock for a few weeks, though Martin was kind enough to offer me a freebie Snow Territory mat, which he explained had some yellowed stain marks on it. I gladly accepted the offer, and am reviewing the mat now, with the noted discolouration noted and allowed for. I recently reviewed their 6’x3′ Space Mat along with the Fantasy Flight 3’x’3′ X-Wing Starfield Mat.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat.

Once again, the Urbanmatz mat is on neoprene (mouse pad material) and is quite nice. I wasn’t sure what to expect when it was offered, and while I was secretly hoping for a 6×4, was expecting a 4×4, not wanting to get my hopes up – but it turned out that it was a full-sized 6×4 mat.

Now I don’t have any models at all based for a snow environment, and even my thoughts around (eventually) playing Frostgrave involved basically ignoring the cold-weather setting but my initial thoughts when it was offered was actually to use it as a second mat for X-Wing, especially given the precedent from the recent films for atmospheric fighter battles.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat.

Unlike some other Snow/Arctic mats I’ve browsed recently, the details in the Urbanmatz offering are quite subtle and non-specific, even being pretty scale-agnostic. Just offering a hint of something buried below the snow, but subtle enough that the mat could also be used as a cloudscape if that was something needed for a game. I’d take some comparison pictures showing the textures with 15mm armour followed by 28mm infantry if I had anything painted appropriately.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Star Wars X-Wing

I did spend the better part of an afternoon with Marouda setting up and laying out figures to see how it all would look. First up were a couple of flights of X-Wing ships.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Star Wars X-Wing

I honestly think it looks a treat for X-Wing and gives a nice unique look to the (pretend) battle – and should do so when we actually do play X-Wing on it.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat.

Here’s a close-up of some of the discolouration on the mat. I was expecting it to be far worse, potentially in large yellow piss-patches in the middle of the mat but the issues are limited to a few places around the edge. While I can fully understand why Urbanmatz are unable to sell these, they’re minor enough for me to be able to ignore, especially given that the mat was a freebie

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat, Bolt Action

Time for some 28mm models, then. As mentioned before, I lack enough proper painted WW2 to really do much, and I’m completely lacking in snow-themed terrain, so I laid down some old, old Armorcast ruined building corners and my platoon of painted Warlord T-34/85 tanks. The tanks looked alright, though obviously whitewashed would have fit in more effectively.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat, Bolt Action

The buildings, left unbased as they are is usually a positive on darker surfaces as it allows for much more modularity, but on the Snowy Terrain mat they do kinda stand out too starkly. Clearly, if I want to do much with this mat, I should sort out some snow-covered hills and perhaps a few copses of snow-tipped trees. Frozen lake? Snow-covered cabin? Grimdork from Dakka did a whole little snow-themed table recently, and I do have a jar of Jo Sonja’s texture paste around here somewhere…

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat, Bolt Action

The buildings could probably work reasonably well on the Snowy mat if I were to make some squares of “internal damaged building” to lay in the middle of them. Or maybe even some squares of appropriate-looking linoleoum cut with slightly uneven edges?

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Frostgrave

Next up was to lay some more dense scenery onto the mat and see how it looked. First up we went for a kind of Fantasy layout, a pretend-game of Sorta-Frostgrave, to see how it all looks. More specifically to see how my existing terrain worked with the Snow Territory Mat.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Frostgrave

And… it actually looked decent. To me at least. The dark, scorched brown looking bases on both the models and some of the terrain obviously contrast quite starkly with the Snow Territory mat, but it kinda works for me. Obviously snow on bases would make everything tie in much more effectively, but it’s far from awful.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Frostgrave

I hadn’t expected it to work this well, but I found it quite reasonable. Far from perfect, but very workable.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Frostgrave

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Frostgrave

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Frostgrave

Next up I added my Conan Wolves into the fray. Frostgrave has random encounters. Probably not 10 wolves at a time, but whatevs. This is for photos.

So yeah. Not too bad at all. Next up was to swap some of the fantasy terrain out and do the same with some 40k models and terrain.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Warhammer 40,000, 40k, Kill Team

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Warhammer 40,000, 40k, Kill Team

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Warhammer 40,000, 40k, Kill Team

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Warhammer 40,000, 40k, Kill Team

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Warhammer 40,000, 40k, Kill Team

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Warhammer 40,000, 40k, Kill Team

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Warhammer 40,000, 40k, Kill Team

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Warhammer 40,000, 40k, Kill Team

Yeah, that’s a lot of 40k photos. Basically, I took a ton photos and used a small proportion of them above. I guess the point of them all is to give a good “feel” of how the mat works in a smallish 40k game with a pile of scatter terrain on it. I wasn’t hopeful when it came to using it for 40k, but as with the “Frostgrave” game above, I’m pleasantly surprised with how well it works.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Wolf Pack

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Wolf Pack

I thought I’d see how the wolves I painted recently look on the mat without vikings and scenery in the way as well, especially given their snow-grey coats. The answer, pretty decent.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Star Wars Miniatures

Star Wars Imperial transports in roughly 6mm scale? Seems to work well…

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Star Wars Miniatures

As does their larger cousin in (sorta) 28mm scale from the Hasbro/WotC Star Wars Miniatures game.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Star Wars Miniatures

Leading to potential use next time we go to a snow planet in the Star Wars Edge of the Empire RPG (The PC’s minis are on the far right).

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Star Wars Miniatures

I evidently only have 6 Snowtroopers. How embarassing! I also couldn’t find my AT-STs.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Axis & Allies Angels 20, WWII Dogfight, WW2 Dog Fight

Bringing us full circle with some air combat, I got out some Axis & Allies Angels 20 planes to see how it looked.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat. Axis & Allies Angels 20, WWII Dogfight, WW2 Dog Fight

Once again, I feel that it looks fine – Great even for air combat battles. I got out some Soviet and Luftwaffe planes for these pics, but it would work just as well for Western Europe 1945 or any other era’s dogfights above the snow. I had a feeling that it’d look good after seeing the X-Wing ships on it, but I wanted to put the WW2 fighters on it and see for myself.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat.

Urbanmatz' 6'x4' Snow Territory Game Mat.

Once again, the bag shots. The 6×4 bag comes with a carry bag that’s noticeably larger than the 6×3 (above in the shot).

Verdict: I’m very pleasantly surprised with the snow mat. I have to admit, it’s not something I’d have ever really considered purchasing, and getting it for free is the only reason I own it. Having it in hand and having had a significant play around with my models on it along with the camera, I can really appreciate it now – especially given the versatility that I managed to work out of it. It’s perhaps not the very best design out there if you only want to play Frostgrave, but I personally really appreciate the fact that it’s very scale-agnostic and works for games and scales from X-Wing to WW2 Dogfights to the more typical 40k/Frostgrave/etc. Clearly it’d work just as well for SAGA, WHFB, Kings of War, Bolt Action, Flames of War and pretty much anything in pretty much any scale needing a winter snow theme, given some complimentary scenery (which I lack).

And to reiterate – while I received this mat for free, there was no request for, no offer nor any implication of Quid Pro Quo in exchange for it. It was kindly offered (I’d guess because I’d already bought 3 and 2 of them were OOS) and gladly accepted, without knowing the size or condition it would be in, given that they were upfront that it was marked. All of the photos were taken over a couple of sessions as I worked out how best I could make use of it myself, and all of the review text are my honest thoughts, feelings and reflections on the mat.

Roll out the Barrel…. Conan’s Adventure Pack Barrels

Like a many other people in our hobby, I backed the Conan Kickstarter a couple of years ago, and also like many of us, I had my first wave of stuff arrive recently. Now I only got around to taking the stuff out of the shipping boxes last week, and frankly, I haven’t had the time to look further into the actual boxed game or the equally huge “Kickstarter Extras” box. Boxes. I got two King Pledges… 😉

Conan’s Adventure Pack. Sans Barrels…

What I did do while I was cleaning up in the War Room and making space to put the Conan stuff onto one of the shelves was notice how nice the models in some of the add-on boxes looked. Specifically, the “Adventure Pack”. The models looked really fine, baby. That is to say that they looked very finely detailed. Much moreso than anything I’d expect to get from a boardgame, and moreso from a kickstarter boardgame where the usual reaction to the models is “yeah, these are pretty decent” or a sadly unsurprising disappointment. After seeing Subedai get busy with some of his Conan models, I thought “why not?” and opened up the adventure pack to paint the contents as they looked like they’d paint up nice and quickly.

Monolith Games Conan board game Adventure Pack Barrels

…and here are Conan’s Barrels.

So that’s what we have here. Barrels. I haven’t started on the other stuff yet, but the barrels are pretty nice for what they are. I usually paint my barrels up in the standard, admittedly boring way that most of us do. Dark brown wood, metal hoops. Job done. Nothing wrong with that, but with posts by Dagger and Brush on building trees with realistic bark colours resonating in the back of my head, I decided to paint these ones so that they looked a little more …realistic? worn? aged? So they would look like they’ve been left outside in the elements for their time. Faded, stained wood and rusted metal.

Monolith Games Conan board game Adventure Pack Barrels

Conan’s barrels. Stacked. Somewhat..

Primed white, base coated with Vallejo Skeleton Bone coloured primer and then drybrushed with Reaper HD Arctic Grey. Hoops painted with Vallejo Plate Mail Metal coloured primer and then painted over with very-thinned Vallejo Model Air Light Rust and Orange Rust. The whole thing then washed with 50-50 Army Painter Soft tone wash and windex, and then with Citadel Nuln Oil Gloss. Gloss Polyurethane varnish, followed by Testor’s Dullcote. I’ve got that down here fo rmy future reference in case I end up with more of these barrels or want to recreate the exact look. It’s annoying when you paint everything that you have of some kind of scenery, and then find more somewhere, and then can’t remember exactly how you did them. I found some more of those Confrontation walls recently, and so now instead of having painted them more or less instantly, they’re just sitting there. In fact, I’ve lost them again somewhere. Bah.

Monolith Games Conan board game Adventure Pack Barrels, Stonehaven Dwarf Berserker, Reaper Miniatures Dwarf Pathfinder, Eureka Miniatures Beowulf

Norsemen and their Norse Dwarf cousins discuss the best way to provide scale shots for barrels.

After checking the Kickstarter details, I see that each core pledge box comes with an extra 5 chests. Add those to the 5 in the accessories box and I’ll have 15 chests to paint up. They’re pretty finely detailed, but the thing stopping me from blasting through them now is working out how to paint them. Wood? Iron? Bronze? It’s bloody exhausting!

Ow! My Eyeball! ME-61 Throne of Sauron (without Sauron!)

Yeah, so I haven’t been blogging for awhile now. It happens around this time of year – from September to the start of December work really heats up. This year, I’ve pretty much been working every day at work, after work, on days off and on the weekends for the past few weeks – so I’m tired as <pick your profanity> right now.

What I did manage to do for the first month or so was keep on painting, if not blogging or taking many photos, or being active online. This is one of the things I managed to finish. The Reaper Bones pillars I worked on in October were in many ways a lead-in to this model, which I’ve painted for Tarmor, from the Dragons of Lancasm blog. At this point it’s actually been painted for… well, over a month. 6 weeks perhaps? I dunno. We don’t manage to catch up often due to work and conflicting schedules, and so hobby things tend to go between via some mutual friends, and with work the way it’s been I’ve seen less of them lately, and kept forgetting to pass it on when I have…

Almost every time I see this model, the above Simpsons quote pops into my head.

Citadel ME-61 Throne of Sauron

Dating from about 1985, This model is something of a rare breed these days – something I’ve painted for someone else, which is pretty much something I never do anymore. I just don’t have the time these days, and I have way too many models of my own – and I certainly don’t need the money that I used to get for commissions back in the 90’s anymore.

Citadel ME-61 Throne of Sauron

When I first saw the model, my initial thoughts were to do it in what I guess is a pretty “traditional” manner – painting the spine in bone, and firey red-orange bodies and tentacles crawling around the red eye. After a bit of quick reflection, I visualised pretty much the exact scheme I’ve actually painted it in. The spine and ribs sculpted out of a dark green marble, while ethereal spirits writhe around the eye of Sauron, which sucks the light from the creatures around it – providing a nice contrast, and an ersatz eye socket effect.

Citadel ME-61 Throne of Sauron

 

As the ethereals and the throne itself create a rather cold feel, the warm colours of the eye – the redness of the iris and the yellowed eyeball – create a nice contrast that makes The Eye of Sauron really stand out.

Citadel ME-61 Throne of Sauron

While basing is an important thing to consider, there was a kind of dichotomy at play here. I used a rolled-edge base as I wanted the throne to be raised up a little to represent its importance and also to protect the model – old lead chips easily. At the same time, I wanted the floor to be rather understated and generic – both so the model can be used in different settings and also so the actual throne remains the complete focus to the eye. To this end, I went with a simple texture on a rather dull grey. It will fit into dungeons and the like, or also outside if needed, with only a slight greenish tinge/glow to where the floor meets the edges of the ethereals.

Now I just need to get the thing across town to him…

 

Losing my Marble – Reaper Bones Pillars of Good and Evil

Another pair of Bones painted up a few weeks ago, this time it’s Sandra Garrity’s  Pillar of Good and Pillar of Evil from Reaper’s Bones line, from their second Bones Kickstarter.

Reaper Bones 77246: Pillar of Good with Citadel Reiksgard for scale.

Reaper Bones 77246: Pillar of Good with Citadel Reiksgard for scale.

I’ve posed the pillar of good alongside a Reiksgard, as the model has a feel of nobility and goodness. I don’t have any painted SigMarines at this point, so it fell to the knight in shining armour to provide the reference model. No Sir ForScale here!

77247: Pillar of Evil

Reaper Bones 77247: Pillar of Evil with Citadel Dark Elf for scale.

The pillar of evil has a Dark Elf for it’s scale shot. Seems this marble pillar is a bit crooked.

Reaper Bones 77246 Pillar of Good 77247 Pillar of Evil

Reaper Bones Pillars of Good and Evil, side by side.

The pair of these were my first, very rough attempt at painting marble. I’d already started in on both of them before I decided to go with a marble effect rather than simply stone, so perhaps the colours aren’t what they could be. I also based both of them on 32mm citadel bases with a metal washer superglued underneath to give them more stability. As you can see here the Evil pillar isn’t entirely straight because Reaper Bones! They’re not bad pieces, especially for the KS price. Both styles would work better in pairs, but I only have the one of each and I think sourcing a second one of each and then trying to match-paint them is too much mucking about. They’re also probably both more suited to “inside dungeon” type settings than outdoor battlefields.

I used the new “Gloss” versions of Nuln Oil and Axgrax Earthshade on both to see how they perform – the Gloss part not being especially relevant as I varnish my models, but the way that the pigment behaves. I think they did both work well. There was a wash of off-white paint used on the “Good” pillar in an attempt to embed the veins “under” the surface a little. I considered dulling down the bases with some pigments, but I figured that keeping them shiny keeps them a little more flexible in setting.

Anyway, these were pretty quick and easy to do, and it’s another two models done.