RR18 – Eeza Ugezod’s Mother Crushers’ Standard and Musician (Nick Lund, 1985)

RR18 – Eeza Ugezod’s Mother Crushers’ Standard and Musician (Nick Lund, 1985), Oldhammer Citadel Miniatures

RR18 – Eeza Ugezod’s Mother Crushers’ Standard and Musician (Nick Lund, 1985), Oldhammer Citadel Miniatures

Here we have the only two of the Eeza Ugezod’s Mother Crushers that I managed to paint over the years, since purchasing them back in the late 1980’s. The motivation for painting them was actually my Blood Bowl team (Da Blak Flag) – which then became the name of my Orc Army/Tribe. Hence there’s a bit of appropriate iconography on his Black Flag.

RR18 – Eeza Ugezod’s Mother Crushers’ Standard and Musician (Nick Lund, 1985), Oldhammer Citadel Miniatures

Aside from obviously rebasing them onto 32mm round bases from their previous 25mm squares, there’s been a little bit of touch up. Dulling down some of the excessive colour, as I did some time ago with my other Regiment of Renown unit – Golfag’s (Golgfag’s) Ogres. Note the ogres also have the Black Flag iconography, since my Ogres were originally bought and painted to be part of the Orcish army. The slightly awkward twin moons on the top of the banner were originally painted in yellow – you know, how most Orc & Goblin moons are painted in that stylised manner. Unfortunately, they looked like a pair of bananas awkwardly perched on top of the banner. I repainted them in a silver-grey, though a beaten copper could also have looked good and appropriate. The skulls were also repainted from an overly-dark yellow-brown.

RR18 – Eeza Ugezod’s Mother Crushers’ Standard and Musician (Nick Lund, 1985), Oldhammer Citadel Miniatures

RR18 – Eeza Ugezod’s Mother Crushers’ Standard and Musician (Nick Lund, 1985), Oldhammer Citadel Miniatures

The musician with cymbals had similar treatment – overly bright pants toned down, and a bit of edge highlighting added to his instruments.

Oldhammer Orcs

I thought I’d throw in a group shot of all the orcs I’ve completed recently. Not quite an army, or even a proper unit for Kings of War yet, but a reasonable little gang so far, and there’s enough here to cause a little bit of bother using the AoS rules. I should dig out the rest of the Mother Crushers and get them painted, I guess. So much to paint, though…

Two more Marauder MM16 Dwarf Slayers

As I steam (or limp) towards the end of my collection of metal slayers, we have two of the last four Marauder ones – unless I find more in a baggie or box that have been there for years or buy some more off eBay in that never-ending search for “at least one of each sculpt”.

I think I might have gone a little too faded on the tattoos on this pair, particularly Mr.Redstripes.

The second model seems a little goofy to me. Goofier than normal, then. Or worse proportions than normal. Still, put him in a crowd or view him from standing-gamer height and he looks fine.

I gave his kilt (or short skirt) the same tartan that Rowdy Roddy Piper used in his heel heyday against Hulk Hogan during the first Wrestlemania. I’ve used it before on a WarZone figure that I evidently never photographed – I’ll have to fix that shortly. Anyway, it’s simple and effective from a distance. Probably the reason that Hot Rod used it back in the day.

And here’s the pair of them. One more pair to go and the Marauder Slayers are done! Then it’s full-pelt into the ’93-94 Giant Slayers, then the character models, then the AoW characters, then…. well, that’s still to be decided…

 

 

Another pair of Kev Adams’ Citadel Orc Boyz (WHFB 4th Edition)

Today we have a couple more of Kev Adams’ Orcs that I’ve recently painted. These figures are from the 1992-93 period, or the early days of WHFB 4th edition.

Orc with Sword 1, Oldhammer, Kev Adams

Orc with Sword 1, Oldhammer, Kev Adams

Unlike the big’uns that I painted a little while ago and placed on 32mm bases, these figures fit nicely on standard 25mm bases.

Orc with Axe and Dagger 1, Oldhammer, Kev Adams

Orc with Axe and Dagger 1, Oldhammer, Kev Adams

I’ve painted them to broadly match the other Orcs I’ve been painting recently. Once again, the grinning goblin-faced shield is from the Warhammer Fantasy Regiments plastic boxed set from early 3rd edition. I haven’t got a lot of other commentary on them for the time being. A couple more orcs for the pile!

Review: Russian Alternative – The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #1 and #2

About a month or so ago, I ordered a pile of Dwarfs from Russian Alternative via their eBay store. Mostly Chaos Dwarfs, the line being called “Fire Canyon”, and also a few of their “Regular” Dwarf line. Today, I’m giving an overview of the first two of the models, which I’ve just gotten ready for painting. As with all of my reviews, I purchased the products myself and there’s no quid pro quo going on here in exchange for a favourable review. I know I always appreciate being able to see clear photographs of models I’m considering purchasing, and it can be much harder to find that when we’re looking at non-Citadel product.

Packaging:

Russian Alternative - The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #1

Russian Alternative - The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #2

RA’s models all come inside a thin cardboard box, with a colour photograph on the front of the model inside. Sealed by a RA sticker which I guess also functions as a form of security sticker in the retail environment, the “plastic” sticker on the back refers to resin (which is a kind of plastic) as opposed to HIPS or ABS or Restic or any of the other plastics that we wargamers are accustomed to.

Inside, the figure is protected by being sandwiched between two layers of foam. I really like this. It’s not as “pretty” as a blister pack, but I’ve received SO many resin models from a variety of companies that have had the figures arrive damaged simply from bouncing around in a blister, with components smacking into each other. It’s simple, but the secure fit these figures had by being packaged in such a way is a big positive for me, especially as I buy so much of my stuff online. There’s also a little “thank you” card inside that provides contact details in case you have a miscast item or any issues.

Russian Alternative - The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #1

Russian Alternative - The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #1

The Sculpts:

Russian Alternative’s models used to be made soley in metal. In fact, many of the models I purchased were also available as metals, but I went entirely for resin with this order, one of the reasons being that their resin is extremely competitively priced. The sculpted detail is fine and, well, detailed. Certainly on a par with Forge World, for a fraction of the price. Very clean casts with almost no flash and minimal mold lines.

Russian Alternative - The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #2

Russian Alternative - The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #2

Russian Alternative - The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #2

One of the two Berserker heroes – the one with the greataxe – came with a slotta that fitted into the provided base, the other model – armed with hand blades – did not, and in fact his hooved feet aren’t even flat and don’t rest on the ground evenly. He’d need to be mounted differently, or have the heat treatment in order to flatten his stance.

Russian Alternative - The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #1 and #2

Russian Alternative - The Berserker Dwarf of Fire Canyon #1 and #2

Being resin, both figures got a soak in dishwashing liquid and a scrub in order to remove any mould release. There was a bit of sheen left in parts of the models, and so to be safe I gave both a coat of watered down Citadel Liquid Greenstuff. As I prefer the aesthetics of round bases, they both got those instead of squares, and as heroes, I gave them 32mm bases instead of 25mm ones.

I didn’t want to heat treat his legs, and so Berserker #1 got mounted onto a blob of greenstuff with super glue (and I smushed some skulls into it for good measure) and his friend simply had his tab clipped off and was superglued down. The separate arm and greataxe fit pretty well (I accidently clipped off more than I sould have from his arm – but I was able to fill the gap with putty. I then primed with grey and then zenithally primed with white. I did forget to glue some slate to their bases, so that’ll be next, then it’s time to paint!

Verdict:

I’m very happy with these models. The price was very reasonable, service was good, shipping fast, packaging safe and the models themselves are very nice. I’ve got a ton more of these to work through, and I honestly haven’t even opened any of the others yet. I figure I’ll try and work my way through these guys and paint them as I go. I might even get them all done by the end of the year!

These two will slot in with the many Dwarf Slayers I’ve been painting this year, and so hopefully I’ll have the finished product to share in a week or two. Wish me luck!

 

77191: Hydra (Reaper Bones)

77191: Hydra, Reaper Bones

Today’s model is the Reaper Bones Hydra, from their first Kickstarter. This model is one that I started about 14 months ago. I wanted it to work decently both as a display model as well as a wargaming piece. I used a few pieces of slate, carefully placed, including a nice sized piece in order to elevate the model – both literally and figuratively. During the process of painting this model and the time that it spent sitting on my desk waiting for some attention, I noticed that the heads of this Bones hydra tend to get a bit lost amongst one another.

77191: Hydra, Reaper Bones

These first two photographs serve well to illustrate a couple of things about how Games Workshop/Citadel paint and pose their multi-headed models. Workshop seem to either carefully split the heads, avoiding having any in almost-identical side-by-side poses as the two rear ones on the Bones model are. With other models, such as Archaon, GW design their models specifically to have the heads painted in different colours or styles – which again helps them to stand out from one another. Which isn’t to say that this sculpt, by Sandra Garrity is a bad one. Just that the way that the model is posed compared to other, more recent models which are sculpted perhaps it’s fair to say – with the finished, painted product more in mind became apparent. I think simply changing the pose of either the middle rear or middle left head head/neck would elevate this model further.

77191: Hydra, Reaper Bones

I’ve been painting for a long time now, and I’ve been able to turn out things to a nice standard for a lot of that time. I was commission painting when I was 16, and at 18 I won Best Figure and Best 40k figure at Cancon. (Before they gave trophies, unfortunately – assuming that they do now? I got a pair of certificates which are well lost at this point.) While that’s all well and good, what it really means is that as a painter I hit my plateau pretty early, and improving further from there has been a long, slow process.

77191: Hydra, Reaper Bones

Since I started blogging again as a way to share my models and motivate me to paint more, I’ve also been trying to improve and add new skills to my bow. Part of that is risk-taking and experimenting with new methods, materials and techniques. I have more than one of these models, since Bones 1 was in the days I went quite heavy on Kickstarters. Knowing that I had another one up my sleeve allowed me the freedom to try something I probably would not ordinarily have tried – that is instead of painting the Hydra in a shade of green, or even a turquoise/teal that fits my overall Dark Elf scheme, I went for what I wanted to be more naturalistic browns. I also played around with my airbrush (which I am awful with!) to try and achieve some nice looking gradients. While that actually worked(!), I felt that the rather deep scales sculpted onto this model demanded more contrast since the airbrushing was so smooth and the sculpted scales didn’t stand out at all.

77191: Hydra, Reaper Bones

A Dark Elf provides a comparison for our scale shot.

My (attempted) solution – which in my opinion didn’t work well – and is the reason that the model then spent a year (or two?) sitting on my desk unfinished until recently was to try a mix of Minitaire’s Airbrush Paints – specifically, their Ghost Tints. I’ve used them before, though never on a model this size. Now coming to the model for the first time and seeing it finished in these pics, it might look fine to the reader. But you know when you have a picture in your head about how you’d like something to look? Now imagine that, and imagine it coming along nicely, and then imagine it all coming undone once it dries. Now if I’d gone for Oil Washes, I probably could have removed it all due to the way that oil paints dry much more slowly and can still be removed and cleaned up with spirits.

I think the base worked out well, but in the end, the model fell short of what I’d envisioned for it. Could I go back and try to fix it up and redo elements of the model? Sure, but at the same time, I have another one to paint that would be a better use of my time than repainting this one, and my enthusiasm for this particular model waned to the point where it literally sat in front of me for over a year before I made myself finish it off. Sometimes you’ve just got to call something good enough for what it is, and call it done. In the end, the model looks decent and perfectly fine for a wargaming model.

In gaming terms, the model will have a home in the Pan-Elven army to start with (using the Dark Elf/Twilight Kin list), and eventually find a home with the Mythological Greek Army.

 

Stonehaven Dwarves – Fighter and Paladin

Following on from those dreadful greenskins, we have a pair of heroic dwarves. This time, another duo from the Stonehaven Miniatures Dwarf Kickstarter. These are the Dwarf Fighter (Female) and Dwarf Paladin (Male) – though let’s face it – either of the pair could fill either role.

Stonehaven Dwarf Fighter, Stonehaven Dwarf Paladin

As I’ve noted before, these aren’t the very best dwarf sculpts on the market, though they do fill in a nice alternative source of non-standard and RPG-ish dwarves with a solid old-school charm to them, along with enough character to endear them.

Stonehaven Dwarf Fighter, Stonehaven Dwarf Paladin

I’ve painted the pair of them with a touch of blue in their armour and similar enough blue cloth so that they can fit in with the Dwarves I’ve been painting for the KoW army. They also make a decent enough pair for any other RPG or adventure game. I kind of get a father-daughter vibe from the pair of them. The headstrong young dwarf woman and her grumpy old man father. Both quite adept in caving in the heads of greenskins. 😉

Kev Adams’ Heartbreaker Orc Warlord (1995)

I’d planned to take new, better group photos of the Iron Warriors for today’s post, but unfortunately I was feeling under the weather yesterday, and am still that way now – so it didn’t happen. With a solid week of work ahead of me, it’ll hopefully happen next weekend!

In the meantime, here’s a model where I already had the photographs ready. This guy is another of my renovated models. Having been painted back some number of years ago, the overall palette I’d used was more than a little too garish and had a few too many colours for my modern, more refined taste. The solution? Repaint parts of the model, tone some of it down, and give it a new base. Ergo! A new lease on life for this previously rather sad model.

Kev Adams' Heartbreaker Orc Warlord (1995)

The slotta dates this model as sculpted back in 1995. It’s a hella-chunky model, and the huge shoulderpads really give him some heft. I think the rather plain helmet could have been a lot nicer, though. As with much of the old-school stuff in my collection, I purchased this model back in the 1990’s. Part of Kev Adams’ post-GW output, I find it odd that someone like RPE hasn’t re-released it alongside the other Heartbreaker stuff that they have.

Kev Adams' Heartbreaker Orc Warlord (1995)

Originally I’d painted him as a Black Orc, which means I started him before the current line of plastics or their predecessors that share the current aesthetic in metal. I rebased him onto a 32mm base, which fits the figure much more betterer. I also lightened up his skin from the near-black that it was and repainted many of the “soft parts”, making his leather and cloth accessories much more appropriate. Purple pouch? Yellow wristbands? Ugh! Much nicer this way…